live in your joy

sleep. eat. move. hug. play. meditate. massage. breathe!

i am a mom. a wife. a sister and friend. i am a loyal fan of yoga, live music, beautiful food, cities, do-gooders, and the great outdoors. with gratitude, i am also a massage therapist and bring to you over ten years of experience living and breathing the work that i love. i continually feel honored to assist others through the simple and transformative power of touch. 

philosophy:

my mission in our practice together is to provide you with highly skilled, compassionate care that partners with, supports, and inspires YOU through your journey to become your happiest, healthiest self.  in every session, i promise to be fully present to you. to listen openly.  to be guided by and work in unison with the deep wisdom shared through your mind, body, and spirit.

i am passionate about the healing powers of touch and the body's wisdom to engage with and create change through that touch. clients tell me they experience sustained pain relief, quieting of the mind, new levels of self-awareness, renewed feelings of energy and power, increased flow, connection, and grounding. amazing!

i view mindful, knowledgeable bodywork as an instrument of holistic self-health care, rather than as pampering or luxury. my approach is grounded in the study of soft tissue work (trigger point/neuromuscular therapy, myofascial release, and deep tissue methods), anatomy, physiology, nutrition, yoga, and cranial sacral therapy. i am certified in pregnancy massage and adore assisting in making the process more comfortable, informed, and in passing on the love--creating calming neuro-pathways for mom and babe.  

some background:

i earned my b.a. at sarah lawrence college in new york (1999). next came some extensive backpacking (and even some open ocean sailing) through south east asia, australia, solomon islands, new zealand. it was on this journey i received the first and second massages of my life. they were each completely different and forever memorable--one on the floor of a hut in laos, the other after a hike through the rain, snow, and clouds of new zealand. while both impactful, i had no thought i would later find my future path and passion in bodywork. returning to the u.s., i had the honor to teach high school english in the mississippi delta through teach for america (where i met my hero husband, jay). post my two year teaching commitment, i wrote grants at a local arts council and dug in the dirt as a gardener. i relished this duality and balance of using my brain and body equally and for good, for change and growth. i imagined myself continuing in this non-profit/service-learning world.

soon, however, i felt a strong and unexpected pull toward the field of healing arts and touch therapy.  it was not a direction i understood nor a direction in which i could foresee my social-justice self going, but i decided to follow. seeking mountains, ocean, city and sushi, i left the south and enrolled in a rigorous 1000-hour massage therapy program (including cadavar study) at the brian utting school of massage in seattle, washington. upon embarking on this path--picture old-school burgandy volvo station wagon filled with plants and boxes and an orange cat named hattie--it felt immediately and infinitely right. and quickly became my passion.

what i learned through education and experience, my soul somehow already knew--compassionate touch is a powerful agent for healing, for self-awareness and change. it can be spirit lifting and joy-producing. it can create calm and remind the body it can live in a happier, more ease-filled state. it is a great aid in helping us tune in to our best, brightest self. 

the layers i discovered and am discovering still are profound, the possibilities of this work continue to unfold and astound me. i am a student. i love to learn. about people. cultures. food. as it turns out, i am also a keen student of anatomy and physiology, endocrinology. the facial system, the nervous system. trauma. pain. sacred space. release. relief. i seek to better understand nutrition and emotion and the gut. the messages our brain sends to the rest of our being and the rest of our being sends to our brain. wow, how i love love love my work!!!

in 2005 i graduated, became nationally certified, state-licensed, and opened my first practice. i have held private practices both in seattle--amidst snow peaked mountains and ocean vistas--and in madison, wisonsin--where i traded my hiking books for cycling (and snow shovels), became a wife to a phd student, a mama, and had the honor to serve as a birth doula and a member of the madison doula collective.  

a gsu prof position for jay brought us to atlanta in the summer of 2013. yay! we immediately felt at home here, enticed by the warmer climate and the city's surprising walkability, the urban green spaces, the fine eateries, and y'all's friendliness. my atlanta massage practice dwells in the heart of our beloved candler park neighborhood--part of the radial cafe building and blocks from marta, mary lin, and our home. so happy to be here!

cannot wait for you to visit!!

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research: [different page?]

i view mindful bodywork as an instrument of holistic self health care, rather than as pampering or luxury. more and more research is finding massage to be an effective healing therapy. i appreciate integrative medicine's continued focus on the importance of calming our mind and reducing stress, increasing movement and exercise, honoring sleep and nutrition as essential for core health. our soft tissue and nervous system can get stuck in holding or protective patterns, in states of pain and aggravation. massage as a practice and complimentary therapy helps to release these holdings, reset our nervous system, and enhance our mood. in short, massage supports whole-health and well-being. bring on the joy!

 

integrative health

http://health.usnews.com/health-conditions/heart-health/integrative-medicine/overview

find more links... see terri gross special...

from psychology today...

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/overcoming-pain/200809/the-laying-hands-makes-comeback

research is asking us to view massage not as a luxury but as a part of our whole-health and wellness care. 

Anxiety is a potent force, often resulting in the magnification of pain and suffering. Its alleviation is key in us all, terminal cancer patient or not

the most consistent effect of massage has been to reduce levels of anxiety. anxiety is a potent force, often resulting in the magnification of pain and suffering. alleviating it is key to that balanced, happy, whole-health self. (laying on of hands, psychology today)

It has been theorized that massage may short-circuit this cycle of stress and distress [continued physical and emotional pain] through providing the following:
1. The nurturing effect of the therapist, who provides communication and demonstrates the desire to make a difference.
2. Induction of relaxation, with improved circulation, easing of muscle spasms, in turn causing increased endogenous endorphin release.
3. Competing sensory stimuli that override pain signals (recall how we all rub our head when we whack it on that annoying shelf).

massage appeared to have an immediate beneficial effect on pain and mood among patients.

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extra material (repetitive) to work with....

our body-mind-spirits hold deep wisdom and my hands listen openly to and are guided by what each person's shares.  

[My mission is to partner with you as we explore the unique balance within your own being--mind, body, and spirit.  Working together, i will support you in creating awareness and change where needed--quieting the mind, experiencing freedom from pain, increasing flow and connection--so you can more easily live in your happiest, healthiest self.]

following a b.a. from sarah lawrence college, i took a year to backpack through S.E. Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. on this journey i received the first and second massages of my life. they were both completely different and forever memorable- one on the floor of a hut in laos, the other after a hike through the rain, snow and clouds of new zealand. Coming from a social justice and multi-cultural literature background, i had no idea i would later find my future path and passion in bodywork.  when i returned to the u.s. i had the honor to teach high school english in the mississipi delta through teach for america. post my 2 year teaching commitment, i found myself writing grants at a local arts council and digging in the dirt as a gardener. I relished this duality and balance of using my brain and body equally and for good, for change and growth. I imagined i would continue in the field of non-profit work. soon, however, i would feel something else tugging at my soul, a notion that made no sense to me at the time... a career in massage therapy?  in my limited experience with bodywork, massage rested squarely in the realm of pampering, fluff, and luxury. it did not seem to fit in or feed the world with which i identitified.  And yet the pull grew stronger, the call beckoned. And i decided to follow.  also seeking mountains and ocean and sushi, i left the south and enrolled in a rigorous 1000-hour massage therapy program (including the study of cadavar) at the Brian Utting School of Massage in Seattle, Washington. 

What was revealed to me through education and experience, my soul somehow already knew--compassionate touch is powerful agent for healing, for self-awareness and change. it can be spirit lifting and joy-producing. it can create calm and remind the body it can live in a happier, more ease-filled state. it is a great aid in helping us tune in to our best, brightest self. 

it is not a luxury, but a right. god damnit. massage for all :)

the layers i discoverered and am still discovering are profound, the possibilities of this work continue to unfold and amaze me. i am a student. i love to learn. about people. about cultures. about the food we select to nourish ourselves. and, as it turns out, i am a student of about anatomy and physiology, endocrinology.  about the messages our brains send to the rest of our being and the rest of our being sends to our brain. about the nervous system and the facial system. about the gut. about living life happier and healthier.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

see the terri gross special

from psychology today...

research is asking us to view massage not as a luxury but as a part of our whole-health and wellness care. the most consistent effect of massage has been to reduce levels of anxiety. anxiety is a potent force, often resulting in the magnification of pain and suffering. alleviating it is key to that balanced, happy, whole-health self. my intent is to keep the cost affordable and the results effective.  (laying on of hands, psychology today)

It has been theorized that massage may short-circuit this cycle of stress and distress [continued physical and emotional pain] through providing the following:
1. The nurturing effect of the therapist, who provides communication and demonstrates the desire to make a difference.
2. Induction of relaxation, with improved circulation, easing of muscle spasms, in turn causing increased endogenous endorphin release.
3. Competing sensory stimuli that override pain signals (recall how we all rub our head when we whack it on that annoying shelf).

massage appeared to have an immediate beneficial effect on pain and mood among patients

 

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i bring to you over ten years of experience doing the work that i love.